Sustainability of Barrier Island Protection Policies under Changing Climates

This project will address methods to adapt beach and dune nourishment to improve resilience in a changing climate. As storms become more powerful and seas continue to rise, major erosion events will occur more frequently. However, coastal communities do not yet understand how to evaluate their increasing vulnerabilities and adapt their long-term planning. In this project, we will identify the climate patterns that most often trigger the need to nourish, the variability of the time interval between such nourishments, and the economic costs and sediment volumes necessary to maintain this coastal protection policy into the 21st century.

A stochastic climate emulator will first be developed to simulate 1000s of realizations of chronological climate patterns (forced by satellite and GCM products) to create future storm events coupled with sea level rise scenarios. A library of high fidelity, open source, hydrodynamic and morphodynamic simulations (ADCIRC+SWAN and XBeach) will then be used to develop a surrogate model to predict erosion and flooding for each future realization. Triggers like beach width, dune height, and community preferences will be used to identify how often communities will need to re-nourish, contingent on future climate and sea level rise scenario.

JC Dietrich, DL Anderson. “Sustainability of Barrier Island Protection Policies under Changing Climates.” U.S. Coastal Research Program, 2019 Academic Research Opportunities, 2019/10/18 to 2021/10/17, $226,624 (Dietrich: $226,624).

Dylan Anderson

Updated 2020/01/20

Post-doc (Oak Ridge Institute of Science & Education)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
North Carolina State University
Mann Hall, Room 424A
2501 Stinson Drive
Raleigh NC 27607
danders5@ncsu.edu

 

I am an ORISE post-doc working at both the USACE Field Research Facility and the Coastal and Computational Hydraulics Team at NC State University. My work incorporates open-source platforms to model coastal conditions, observations of the nearshore to assess model performance, and projections of future erosion and flooding hazards.

Specific projects, publications, and CV can be found on my website.