Poster: Fall 2023 Conferences

Poster: Undergraduate Research Symposium 2023

JT Voight, JS Knowles, TA Cuevas López, JC Dietrich. “How will Sea Level Rise affect the Storm Surge in Norfolk, Virginia?Undergraduate Research Symposium, North Carolina State University, 27 July 2023.

How will Sea Level Rise affect the Storm Surge in Norfolk, Virginia?

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Conference: USNCCM 17

Conference: ADCIRC Users Meeting 2023

Jenero selected as Global Change Research Fellow

Ph.D. student Jenero Knowles was selected as a Global Change Research Fellow by the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center. Jenero will participate in the 2023-2024 cohort and receive training and collaborate with students from across disciplines in climate science.

The fellowship program is designed to train the next generation of global change scientists by providing financial, scientific, and professional development support for graduate students who are interested in multi-disciplinary research. They come together across disciplines to discover, collaborate, and share their knowledge with diverse stakeholders. Learn more about the program at the SECASC web site.

Congratulations to Jenero!

Poster: EWC Symposium 2023

JS Knowles, JC Dietrich. “Storm Surge Predictions at Hyperlocal Sites“. Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering Research Symposium, North Carolina State University, 10 March 2023.

Storm Surge Predictions at Hyperlocal Sites

TA Cuevas López, BJ Tucker, JC Dietrich. “Toward Prediction of High-resolution Maps of Hurricane-driven Coastal Flooding using Deep Learning“. Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering Research Symposium, North Carolina State University, 10 March 2023.

Toward Prediction of High-resolution Maps of Hurricane-driven Coastal Flooding using Deep Learning

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News: Preparing for a Changing Climate

2023/01/11 – UDaily, University of Delaware
UD civil engineers lead research to examine models for coastal readiness at U.S. military bases

University of Delaware civil engineers are leading a multi-institutional effort to identify the best models to calculate flood risk at coastal military installations where climate change threatens to increase the risk of flood damage from sea level rise and storm surge.

The four-year project, which launched in mid-2022 and will run through spring 2025, is funded by a $2.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Project partners include faculty and students from the Netherlands, North Carolina State University, the University of South Alabama, Texas A&M and the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

“The goal is to provide guidance to the DoD about the strengths and weaknesses of each model in comparison. They’re all going to have things they’re good with and things they struggle with,” Dietrich said. Those comparisons will help the agencies decide what types of models they want to use to get what types of information — depending on how much time, effort and funding they want to commit.

There’s also a goal of reducing cost and building smarter models, he said.

“If we are able to improve our predictions at very specific sites along the coast, we also can have better predictions at other specific sites along the coast, like someone’s house or a bridge or other infrastructure,” Dietrich said.

Conference: YCSECA 2022