Jenero Knowles

Updated 2021/08/03

Ph.D. Candidate (Graduate Research Assistant)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
North Carolina State University
Fitts-Woolard Hall, Room 3121
915 Partners Way
Raleigh, NC 27606
jsknowle@ncsu.edu

Hey there! I am a first year Ph.D. candidate in the Coastal and Computational Hydraulics Team (CCHT) at NC State University. I was born and raised in The Bahamas, which is an archipelago of islands just southeast of Florida and north of the Greater Antilles in the Caribbean, a region prone to hurricanes. As I grew older, my curiosity cultivated as tropical storms produced severe flooding on the islands while structures such as seawalls and jetties were in place to protect the shorelines. This led to my undergraduate degree in civil engineering where I took courses in water resources and learned more about wave variations and their effects on its surrounding environments. Combining my interest of coastal waves and a desire to mitigate flooding from storms, I knew that delving into research would help me to discover solutions to some coastal engineering issues.

I will be working on a project, “A Comparative Assessment of Total Water Levels for coastal military facility readiness and resilience using numerical models ,” where I will use ADCIRC to investigate all the relevant physics that contribute to total water levels. The model produced from ADCIRC will be compared with other models prepared by a group of researchers from different institutions. As I continue to expand my knowledge, I look forward using and learning different modeling software used in the industry.

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Jessica Gorski

Updated 2021/07/29

M.S. Student (Graduate Research Assistant)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
North Carolina State University
Fitts-Woolard Hall, Room 3121
915 Partners Way
Raleigh NC 27607
jfgorski@ncsu.edu

I am a recent graduate of North Carolina State University, and I am excited to continue my education with the CCEE Department. As an undergraduate, I had the opportunity to participate in multiple research projects with the coastal engineering team. My first research experience was funded by the College of Engineering’s Women and Minority Summer Research Program. After completing the 10-week research project, I started an undergraduate research assistant position and was introduced to the morphological model eXtreme Beach (XBeach). Since then, the majority of my research experience has been focused on nearshore morphodynamics and erosional modeling. Previously, I assisted a project funded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers looking at the morphological response of a beach nourishment project located in Nags Head, North Carolina. As a research assistant, I helped in the development and training of a morphological emulator. Future work for this project includes incorporating climate change projections and investigating how these projections may impact the shoreline response.

I am working on a Department of Defense project, Forecasting Coastal Impacts from Tropical Cyclones along the US East and Gulf Coasts using the ADCIRC Prediction System, where I will be focusing on the sediment transport portion of the coastal impact forecasting. I am looking forward to using XBeach as a tool for erosional forecasting and collaborating with a larger team of researchers across the country.

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Brooke Rumbaugh

I am a first year graduate student in the CCHT at North Carolina State University. I am originally from West Virginia, which is a completely landlocked state. It was actually through traveling and vacations that my love of the coast developed. After I received my bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Marshall University (Huntington, WV), I began looking into master’s programs. During this search, I discovered coastal engineering. After learning about what coastal engineering was about and speaking with some coastal engineers, I discovered it was a perfect way to implement my love of coasts into my career.

Currently, I am involved in a research project: “Improving Predictions of Estuarine Flooding and Circulation during Storms.” This project addresses the issue of storm-driven circulation and flooding in estuaries for the North Carolina coast. It includes the enhancement of the exiting modeling and extend it to consider the density-driven circulation and salinity transport. I look forward to continuing to expand my knowledge and to learn to use new modeling software.

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Johnathan Woodruff

Updated 2021/10/15

Ph.D. Candidate (Graduate Research Assistant)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
North Carolina State University
Mann Hall, Room 424
2501 Stinson Drive
Raleigh, NC 27607
jlwoodr3@ncsu.edu

Ahoy! I am a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Coastal and Computational Hydraulics Team (CCHT) at NC State. Having been born and raised in Florida, I developed a love for the coastline and a passion for understanding and protecting it. During my undergraduate studies at the University of Florida, I took a few classes in coastal/water resources engineering and decided to pursue it further with a master’s degree at Georgia Tech. There I specialized in coastal and water resources engineering and found my passion.

At Georgia Tech, I took a particular interest in Coastal Hazards work which led me to the CCHT here at NC State. I am currently working on the NSF project “Subgrid-Scale Corrections to Increase the Accuracy and Efficiency of Storm Surge Models,” which aims to reduce computation times of storm surge forecasting while retaining the same level of accuracy used in high resolution models. So far, I have successfully incorporated sub-mesh corrections into ADCIRC. I hope to push these corrections further by implementing them in storm surge forecasting scenarios to drastically reduce computational run times. During my tenure at NC State I have participated in rapid storm surge gauge field deployments which has given me an appreciation for field data collected during storm events. This data gives validation to our model results and demonstrates that our models are providing accurate predictions. In addition, I would like to investigate the interaction between storm surge and rainfall events and its effects on both coastal and inland structures.

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Alireza Gharagozlou

Updated 2017/03/06

Alireza-Thumbnail PhD Candidate (Graduate Research Assistant)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
North Carolina State University
Mann Hall, Room 428
2501 Stinson Drive
Raleigh NC 27607
agharag@ncsu.edu

I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Coastal Engineering at NC State University. My research interests mainly include coastal hydrodynamics, numerical modeling, and sediment transport. During my masters at the University of Tehran, I worked on morphological modeling methods to speed up the simulation time of coastal erosion and sedimentation near a breakwater.

Currently, I’m involved in the NC Sea Grant project “Interactions between Waves, Flooding and Beach Morphology during Storm Events.” As part of my research, I am modeling the breaching of the Outer Banks during storm events. The goal is to extend the domain and provide guidance for the entire Hatteras Island. For this purpose, we are using XBeach as a morphological modeling tool and ADCIRC+SWAN to model the tides and water circulations during the hurricane. Eventually, we will develop a two-way coupled ADCIRC+SWAN and XBeach models so that the wave and tidal boundary condition for the XBeach domain will be provided by ADCIRC computation and after the morphology run, new topography and bathymetry data will be sent back to ADCIRC to continue the simulation.

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