Brooke Rumbaugh

I am a first year graduate student in the CCHT at North Carolina State University. I am originally from West Virginia, which is a completely landlocked state. It was actually through traveling and vacations that my love of the coast developed. After I received my bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Marshall University (Huntington, WV), I began looking into master’s programs. During this search, I discovered coastal engineering. After learning about what coastal engineering was about and speaking with some coastal engineers, I discovered it was a perfect way to implement my love of coasts into my career.

Currently, I am involved in a research project: “Improving Predictions of Estuarine Flooding and Circulation during Storms.” This project addresses the issue of storm-driven circulation and flooding in estuaries for the North Carolina coast. It includes the enhancement of the exiting modeling and extend it to consider the density-driven circulation and salinity transport. I look forward to continuing to expand my knowledge and to learn to use new modeling software.

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Autumn Poisson

Updated 2020/01/11

M.S. Student (Graduate Research Assistant)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
North Carolina State University
Mann Hall, Room 424
2501 Stinson Drive
Raleigh NC 27607
apoisso@ncsu.edu

I am in my final year of graduate school with the CCHT at North Carolina State University and will soon be looking for a job. I am originally from Michigan where we have a different kind of coastline, but a very large one none the less. Living near the Great Lakes, my love for the natural environment was always present. I studied environmental science and mathematics at the University of Michigan for my undergraduate degree and then ecology for my masters. After graduating, I worked with various organizations on things related to environmental education, communication and outreach, and fresh water studies, and in a more pivotal position working on a coastal watershed restoration project on a small island in the Pacific Ocean. It was here where I fell in love with that other coast, the salty one. Afterward, I worked in landscape limnology (freshwater) research at Michigan State University with some truly amazing people who helped me develop an interest in the research process. From there I decided I needed a new challenge and needed to develop my own research interests, so I decided to apply to go back to school.

I am currently performing research on the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) project, “Improving the Efficiency of Wave and Surge Models via Adaptive Mesh Resolution“, which has the goal of improving the efficiencies of the widely-used SWAN+ADCIRC models for hurricane waves and storm surge. My role on this project is to determine which components of a storm need to be used to as ’triggers’ for mesh switching for improved simulation efficiency and accuracy.

The first two years of my degree, I worked on the NSF project “Subgrid-Scale Corrections to Increase the Accuracy and Efficiency of Storm Surge Models,” which has the goal of incorporating the more nuanced structure of coastal landscapes available in higher resolution storm surge models into broader scaled models thus reducing computation times while also maintaining model accuracy.

I will be graduating this coming summer (summer 2021) and I hope to use my numerical modeling and quantitative skills to assist coastal communities as they prepare for the unforeseen changes they will experience. This includes learning more about coastal processes and coastal modeling to understand how storm events and subsequent storm surge will impact and alter the coastal landscape. As well as analyzing coastal environment related data and generate guidance to a broad range of users and help communities meet their future needs in addressing strategic climate-water-weather related issues.

In addition to my work at NC State, I am also passionate about my personal health and fitness so I spend most of my free time either at the gym or cooking in the kitchen. I also love to read and spend time in the outdoors. I hope to experience all that North Carolina has to offer from the mountains to the sea.

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Johnathan Woodruff

Updated 2018/06/07

Ph.D. Student (Graduate Research Assistant)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
North Carolina State University
Mann Hall, Room 424
2501 Stinson Drive
Raleigh, NC 27607
jlwoodr3@ncsu.edu

Ahoy! I am a third-year Ph.D. student in the Coastal and Computational Hydraulics Team (CCHT) at NC State. Having been born and raised in Florida, I developed a love for the coastline and a passion for understanding and protecting it. During my undergraduate studies at the University of Florida, I took a few classes in coastal/water resources engineering and decided to pursue it further with a master’s degree at Georgia Tech. There I specialized in coastal and water resources engineering and found my passion.

At Georgia Tech, I took a particular interest in Coastal Hazards work which led me to the CCHT here at NC State. I am currently working on the NSF project “Subgrid-Scale Corrections to Increase the Accuracy and Efficiency of Storm Surge Models,” which aims to reduce computation times of storm surge forecasting while retaining the same level of accuracy used in high resolution models. So far, I have successfully incorporated sub-mesh corrections into ADCIRC. I hope to push these corrections further by implementing them in storm surge forecasting scenarios to drastically reduce computational run times. During my tenure at NC State I have participated in rapid storm surge gauge field deployments which has given me an appreciation for field data collected during storm events. This data gives validation to our model results and demonstrates that our models are providing accurate predictions. In addition, I would like to investigate the interaction between storm surge and rainfall events and its effects on both coastal and inland structures.

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Alireza Gharagozlou

Updated 2017/03/06

Alireza-Thumbnail PhD Candidate (Graduate Research Assistant)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
North Carolina State University
Mann Hall, Room 428
2501 Stinson Drive
Raleigh NC 27607
agharag@ncsu.edu

I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Coastal Engineering at NC State University. My research interests mainly include coastal hydrodynamics, numerical modeling, and sediment transport. During my masters at the University of Tehran, I worked on morphological modeling methods to speed up the simulation time of coastal erosion and sedimentation near a breakwater.

Currently, I’m involved in the NC Sea Grant project “Interactions between Waves, Flooding and Beach Morphology during Storm Events.” As part of my research, I am modeling the breaching of the Outer Banks during storm events. The goal is to extend the domain and provide guidance for the entire Hatteras Island. For this purpose, we are using XBeach as a morphological modeling tool and ADCIRC+SWAN to model the tides and water circulations during the hurricane. Eventually, we will develop a two-way coupled ADCIRC+SWAN and XBeach models so that the wave and tidal boundary condition for the XBeach domain will be provided by ADCIRC computation and after the morphology run, new topography and bathymetry data will be sent back to ADCIRC to continue the simulation.

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