Storm-Driven Erosion and Inundation of Barrier Islands from Dune- to Region-Scales

Barrier islands are susceptible to erosion, overwash, and breaching during intense storms. However, these processes are not represented typically in large-domain models for storm surge and coastal inundation. In this study, we explore the requirements for bridging the gap between dune-scale morphodynamic and region-scale flooding models. A high-resolution XBeach model is developed to represent the morphodynamics during Hurricane Isabel (2003) in the North Carolina (NC) Outer Banks. The model domain is extended to more than 30 km of Hatteras Island and is thus larger than in previous studies. The predicted dune erosion is in good agreement with post-storm observed topography, and an ‘‘excellent’’ Skill Score of 0.59 is obtained on this large domain. Sensitivity studies show the morphodynamic model accuracy is decreased as the mesh spacing is coarsened in the cross-shore direction, but the results are less sensitive to the alongshore resolution. A new metric to assess model skill, Water Overpassing Area (WOA), is introduced to account for the available flow pathway over the dune crest. Together, these findings allow for upscaled parameterizations of erosion in larger-domain models. The updated topography, obtained from XBeach prediction, is applied in a region-scale flooding model, thus allowing for enhanced flooding predictions in communities along the Outer Banks. It is found that, even using a fixed topography in region-scale model, the flooding predictions are improved significantly when post-storm topography from XBeach is implemented. These findings can be generalized to similar barrier island systems, which are common along the U.S. Gulf and Atlantic coasts.

A Gharagozlou, JC Dietrich, A Karanci, RA Luettich, MF Overton (2020). “Storm-driven erosion and inundation of barrier islands from dune- to region-scales.” Coastal Engineering, 158, 103674, DOI: 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2020.103674

Ayse Karanci wins Abstract Competition at iEMSs Conference

Ayse Karanci was a winner in the abstract competition at the 9th International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software. The award included funding to support her travel to the conference in Fort Collins, Colorado, where she presented on “Cyberinfrastructure for Enhancing Interdisciplinary Engagement in Coastal Risk Management Research.”

Although Ayse was never an official member of the CCHT, she did contribute to our Risk Analytics Discovery Environment (RADE) project. Her presentation was related to that project, in which she developed containers for her models for coastal erosion and decision-making in coastal households. We are very proud of her good work.

Cyberinfrastructure for Enhancing Interdisciplinary Engagement in Coastal Risk Management Research

Tackling critical questions often requires the collaboration of researchers from different disciplines or institutions. Coastal hazards research is necessarily interdisciplinary and multi- methodological and often requires a team of researchers, due to its combination of storm-induced changes to the coastal environment, the effects of these changes on built infrastructure, and the combined effects on decision-making for individuals and communities. This paper introduces an interdisciplinary coastal hazard risk model that combines high resolution geospatial data, storm impact forecasts, and an agent-based model in the analysis, and then describes the model’s implementation in a data science cyberinfrastructure. Lessons learned and limitations are also outlined.

A Karanci, L Stillwell, C Lenhardt, JC Dietrich (2018). “Cyberinfrastructure for Enhancing Interdisciplinary Engagement in Coastal Risk Management Research.” 9th International Conference on Environmental Modelling and Software, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA, M Arabi, O David, J Carlson, DP Ames (eds).

Posters: 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting

A Gharagozlou, JC Dietrich, MF Overton, A Karanci. “Modeling the Erosion on Hatteras Island During Hurricane Isabel: Resolution Requirements for Coupling with Circulation-Wave Models.2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, Oregon, 11-16 February 2018.

Modeling the Erosion on Hatteras Island During Hurricane Isabel

R Cyriac, JC Dietrich, A Fathi, C Dawson, K Dresback, CA Blain, M Bilskie, S Hagen, H Graber. “Wind Effects on the Choctawhatchee River Plume at Destin Inlet, Florida.2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, Oregon, 11-16 February 2018.

Wind Effects on the Choctawhatchee River Plume at Destin Inlet, Florida

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Poster: Spring 2017 Conferences

A Gharagozlou, JC Dietrich, M Overton, A Karanci. “Morphological Modeling of Hatteras Island During Hurricane Isabel.” 8th Annual NCEM/ECU Hurricane Conference, Greenville, North Carolina, 24 May 2017.

A Gharagozlou, JC Dietrich, M Overton, A Karanci. “Morphological Modeling of Hatteras Island During Hurricane Isabel.” North Carolina’s Coastal Conference, Raleigh, North Carolina, 4-5 April 2017.

A Gharagozlou, JC Dietrich, M Overton, A Karanci. “Morphological Modeling of Hatteras Island During Hurricane Isabel.” Environmental, Water Resources and Coastal Engineering Research Symposium, North Carolina State University, 3 March 2017.

Morphological modeling of Hatteras Island during Hurricane Isabel

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Conference: ADCIRC 2017

R Cyriac, JC Dietrich, A Fathi, CN Dawson, KM Dresback, CA Blain, M Bilskie, SC Hagen, H Graber. “Circulation Dynamics and Transport Characteristics of Density-driven Flows in the Choctawhatchee Bay and River System.” ADCIRC Users Group Meeting, Norwood, Massachusetts, 04 May 2017.

A Thomas, JC Dietrich, RA Luettich, JG Fleming, BO Blanton, TG Asher, SC Hagen, MV Bilskie, P Bacopoulos. “Hindcasts of Winds and Surge during Hurricane Matthew (2016): Balancing Large-Domain Coverage and Localized Accuracy.” ADCIRC Users Group Meeting, Norwood, Massachusetts, 04 May 2017.

A Gharagozlou, JC Dietrich, A Karanci, MF Overton, RA Luettich Jr. “XBeach Modeling of Erosion During Hurricane Isabel: Resolution Requirements For Coupling With ADCIRC.” ADCIRC Users Group Meeting, Norwood, Massachusetts, 05 May 2017.

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